Femonster

Two twenty-something feminists fighting patriarchy one blogpost at a time

15,097 notes &

What if gun control laws were like abortion laws?

fuckyeahfeminists:

What if gun rights were regulated like abortion rights? Here’s a list of just some of the hoops you’d have to jump through before you could own a gun:

  • Only one store in the entire state would sell guns. (See: Mississippi, Arkansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming for states with only one abortion provider.)
  • You’d have to fill out an enormous personal background check including intrusive personal information that has nothing to do with your ability to own or use a gun. Then you’d have to wait at least 72 hours and come back to the store. (Remember, it’s the only one in the state. You better hope you don’t live on the other side of Wyoming.)
  • Upon your return, you’d have to sit through intensive mandatory counseling. Your counselor, regardless of his personal beliefs, would have to tell you that gun ownership is actually a bad idea, and that it would negatively effect your mental health to own a gun. (This, despite there being no scientific evidence to support the claim.)
  • Next, you’d sit through a gruesome movie showing the actual aftermath of domestic gun crimes. You’d see people with half a head. You’d see dead children in their beds. You’d see the bloody aftermath of a school shooting. You’d be shown statistic after statistic warning you that you’d be contributing to this morally degenerate sanctioning of murder.
  • If you lived in Virginia, you’d have to come back (again) for an invasive and uncomfortable fMRI (which costs around $300 out of your pocket) to ensure your honesty in answering all the background check information and your intentions to use your gun responsibly. (This was as close as I could get to the invasive transvaginal procedure included in the recently passed Virginia bill.)
  • Oh… and if you were married, your spouse might have to sign off on your gun ownership.

(via kungfucarrie)

34 notes &

Back around 1998 I was interviewing for jobs in publishing after I graduated college. I went to a very small indie-type Berkeley company (one of a million in Berkeley) to interview with two people. I very clearly remember that they were all a bit “alternative” looking and were all dressed very casually in jeans, t-shirts, etc. The man who was interviewing me was probably in his late 20′s and looked very laid back, and he made a comment on my nail polish. He mentioned that I was very bold to be wearing a shade like that at a job interview. It was from Revlon and was a new slate blue/grey that had come out. I remember being kind of shocked that he would comment on that, especially considering the type of company they appeared to be like, the fact that I had worked in publishing for 2 years, and had a BA in English. The whole interview after that was him and the woman being a bit snarky and acting like I was a complete idiot for wearing the nail polish.
Three Makeup Memories | Vampy Varnish (via rgr-pop)

(via roughguess)

Filed under make up feminism nail polish why feminism matters why does it matter what nail polish someone wears on an interview

7,375 notes &

livelaughawesome:

socialistexan:

inkdefense:

butts-with-bro-shades:

spiderdyk3:

fatal-encores:

Exactly.

love this.

I’m gonna cry

:)

And if you can tell, they still have no obligation to tell you or anyone else ever, and you sure as hell don’t get to out them.

Passing shouldn’t be a condition of not being outted.

what about “even if you can tell, don’t”

or “even if you can tell, it’s nobody’s fucking business”

or “if you think you can tell, you could be wrong and maybe you should reevaluate your perceptions of gender, assigned-sex, and gender expression”

(Source: mrballard, via takealookatyourlife)

Filed under trans passing

27,978 notes &

barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass
She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

barefootmouse:

womenwhokickass:

Aya Kamikawa: Why she kicks ass

  • She is the only openly transgender official in Japan at this point, and the first to seek or win elected office in Japan.
  • She won a four-year term as an independent under huge media attention, placing sixth of 72 candidates running for 52 seats in the Setagaya ward assembly, the most populous district in Tokyo.  In April 2007, she was re-elected to her second term, placing second of 71 candidates running for 52 in the same ward assembly. 
  • While the government announced that they would continue to consider her male officially, she stated that she would work as a woman. 
  • She is devoted to work for various groups, the disabled, single-parent families, homeless people to evening junior high school students, LGBT people and to improve rights for women, children, the elderly.  She strives to give support for these people and bring positive changes which would help them in society. 
  • She was also a committee member for Trans-net Japan (a self-support group for transgender people) and organised meetings and social events to give support and symposiums to raise the public awareness.

I need to see more stories like this one every day. Actually we all do.

(via anomalisticdotnet)